Scheveningen Beach  
Photo Kees Sherer

Scheveningen Beach 

Photo Kees Sherer

lantz45-haiku-17syllables:

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Spiral Galaxy in Camelopardalis

On August 24th at 12:17 UT, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded this M5.6-category explosion near the eastern limb of the sun.

The source of the blast was sunspot AR2151. As the movie shows, an instability in the suspot’s magnetic canopy hurled a dense plume of plasma into space. If that plasma cloud were to hit Earth, the likely result would be strong geomagnetic storms. However, because of the sunspot’s location near the edge of the solar disk, Earth was not in the line of fire.

Even so, the flare did produce some Earth effects. A pulse of extreme UV radiation from the explosion partially ionized our planet’s upper atmosphere, resulting in a Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID). Waves of ionization altered the normal propagation of VLF (very low frequency) radio transmissions over the the dayside of Earth, an effect recorded at the Polarlightcenter in Lofoten, Norway: data.

Credit: NASA/SDO

(Source: spaceplasma)



 
 

Mantelliceras Ammonite Commune, Mesozoic Era, Lower Cretaceous Period

Antonis Kalantzis
 
Mantelliceras Ammonite Commune, Mesozoic Era, Lower Cretaceous Period
Peter G Elson -Science Fiction Art

Classic Chinese Ancient Buildings Cutaways Li Ganlang [via]

"Li Ganlang 2005 onwards started drawing, anatomical drawings to show the Chinese construction Shi Jingdian construction law, showing Chinese cultural characteristics of various buildings, covered wood constitutive temples, pavilions, towers, gates, caves, bridges, houses and so on five Shiyu Zuo building. By Yuan-Liou Publishing Company."

(Source: archatlas)

NGC 3501
 The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company. However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is anothe…r nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company. The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms. While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Nick Rose. ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

NGC 3501


The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company. However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.
The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.
While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Nick Rose.

ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

(Source: utcjonesobservatory)

Spectacular sunset seen from the ISS! 
Credit: Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev aboard the ISS

Spectacular sunset seen from the ISS! 

Credit: Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev aboard the ISS

Weather on Mars, photographed by Mars Global Surveyor, spring 2001.
Clouds appear to swirl around the highground atop the largest of the Tharsis region’s extinct volcanos. At top, Alba Mons. At left, Olympus Mons. In a diagonal line across the lower half of the image, the Tharsis Montes: (left-to-right) Arsia, Pavonis, and Ascraeus Mons.
10 images, about a week between each, 1st February-20th April 2001. corresponding to Ls 111° to 140° on mars, around the middle of the northern Summer.
Image credit: NASA/JPL/MGS/MSSS. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

Weather on Mars, photographed by Mars Global Surveyor, spring 2001.

Clouds appear to swirl around the highground atop the largest of the Tharsis region’s extinct volcanos. At top, Alba Mons. At left, Olympus Mons. In a diagonal line across the lower half of the image, the Tharsis Montes: (left-to-right) Arsia, Pavonis, and Ascraeus Mons.

10 images, about a week between each, 1st February-20th April 2001. corresponding to Ls 111° to 140° on mars, around the middle of the northern Summer.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MGS/MSSS. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

Isetta Standard (1955)

Isetta Standard (1955)

(Source: specialcar)

lantz45-haiku-17syllables:

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Clouds on Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 4th October 2010.

36 to 43°S, 274 to 276°E on the highlands south of Solis Planum. The Coracis Fossae are somewhat visible at right running vertically down the image.

Coracis is derived from corax, the Latin name of the raven; thus the scientific name of the common or northern raven, Corvus corax.

Animation of 5 monochrome frames, colourized with a composite of 3 visible light images. The colour balance is not naturalistic, but probably close enough here.

Image credit: ESA. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

Man at the console of an IBM 1620 computer.

Man at the console of an IBM 1620 computer.

(Source: Flickr / wrwetzel)